Baltimore Arts & Activism Panel Announced (Nov. 11th)

Baltimore Arts & Activism Panel Announced (Nov. 11th)

The Program in Racism, Immigration, and Citizenship at JHU is thrilled to announce another panel discussion building on its semester-long theme of Black-Asian solidarities. Titled “Art, Power, Politics: Bridging Divides in Baltimore City,” the discussion will feature three local artist-activists, moderated by JHU anthropology professor Alessandro Angelini. It will take place in Hodson Hall 210 on Thursday, November 11, 5pm to 6:30pm.

Speakers: Lady Brion (independent artist-activist), Margaret Huey (independent artist), Cori Dioquino (Asian Pasifika Arts Collective), moderated by Alessandro Angelini (Anthropology) 

Full description: What is anti-racist art? How can artistic expression embody a force of resistance? What is the importance of aesthetics to power, politics, and social change? This panel discussion brings together Baltimore-based artists, activists, and educators whose work traverses the fields of arts practice and aesthetic theory, engaging issues of social and racial justice. This panel will explore the power of the arts to enact transformative social change, specifically asking how art might be leveraged to bridge divides among racialized groups, especially across the unequal terrain of Baltimore City. The discussion further develops RIC’s programmatic focus for the Fall semester of anti-racist alliances and Black-Asian solidarities.   Thursday, November 11, 2021, 5:00pm-6:30pm Location: Hodson 210 Panel discussion featuring Lady Brion (independent artist-activist), Margaret Huey (independent artist), Cori Dioquino (Asian Pasifika Arts Collective), moderated by Alessandro Angelini (Anthropology) Description: What is anti-racist art? How can artistic expression embody a force of resistance? What is the importance of aesthetics to power, politics, and social change? This panel discussion brings together Baltimore-based artists, activists, and educators whose work traverses the fields of arts practice and aesthetic theory, engaging issues of social and racial justice. This panel will explore the power of the arts to enact transformative social change, specifically asking how art might be leveraged to bridge divides among racialized groups, especially across the unequal terrain of Baltimore City. The discussion further develops RIC’s programmatic focus for the Fall semester of anti-racist alliances and Black-Asian solidarities.