Public Arts

The goal of the Public Arts Program is to share the abundance of intellectual human resources at the Homewood campus with historically racially segregated portions of Baltimore City. The program has several components, from lectures, exhibitions and artist residencies, to publishing and performance events.

Visiting Artist Residency

Beginning in Spring 2020, the Visiting Artist Residency provides financial support and work space to an artist in the performing, visual or media arts toward the development and installation of a Baltimore-inspired social practice art project. While in residence, the artist leads a master practitioner workshop, delivers a public presentation, and implements an arts outreach event designed to bridge JHU and communities in Central and West Baltimore.

Donald Bentley Annual Memorial Lecture

The Donald Bentley Annual Memorial Lecture will take place in April 2020. This year’s lecture theme will focus on African American mid-Atlantic performance art traditions. The Donald Bentley Annual Memorial Lecture is the Billie Holiday Project’s capstone annual public lecture to honor the life of one of Baltimore’s promising young leaders who lost their lives in the violence crisis endemic to the city for more than thirty years.  Each year, the Billie Holiday Project invites a distinguished arts practitioner and intellectual to address topical, historical or philosophical issues connecting the work of the arts to the renewal and revitalization of civic life.

The Donald Bentley Annual Memorial Lecture is a unique platform to drive debate and critical reflection on the role of the arts in our everyday lives and in our imagining of a future just world. Speaker to be announced soon.

Billie Holiday Jazz Concert at Lafayette Square

The Annual Billie Holiday Jazz Concert at Lafayette Square is a musical celebration of the rich and important legacy of Billie Holiday. With generous support from Johns Hopkins University Discovery Award Grant Program, the performance is free and open to the public. By taking jazz out of the symphony hall and returning it to its nesting place near Pennsylvania Avenue — the neighborhood of Holiday’s youth — this one-of-a-kind concert establishes a new center of gravity in Sandtown and Upton for fine arts and culture.