People

  • faculty

  • Marina Bedny

    Marina Bedny

    Assistant Professor, Psychological & Brain Sciences

    410-516-2841
    marina.bedny@jhu.edu
    Ames 225

  • post-doctoral fellow

  • Lisa Musz

    Lisa Musz

    emusz1@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: How do the things that we see and the things that we talk about influence what we know about the world, and how is this information organized in the brain? I am interested in studying the roles of vision and language in knowledge, and how changes in experience and context can alter neural representations of semantic memory.

  • graduate students

  • Giulia Elli

    Giulia Elli

    gelli1@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: Much of the way we reason about other people’s mental state and physical abilities is general. However, your body, thoughts and feelings might be different from mine, other people’s like you, or everyone else’s. I’m interested in how we represent different types of person and individuals, especially when they’re different from us. How nuanced are our representations of people’s characteristics and personality? How do they change over development? Do we have a neural “people representational space”? To answer these questions, I use behavioral, developmental and fMRI studies exploring how children and adults think about other people.

  • Shipra Kanjlia

    Shipra Kanjlia

    skanjli1@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: I’m interested in the flexibility of the cortex as result of experience. Some of my work is on how visual experience influences representations of number.

  • Judy Sein Kim

    Judy Sein Kim

    skim346@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: As human beings we think complex thoughts, and we communicate these thoughts with each other. I’m interested in the neural and cognitive bases for language and thought. How flexible is the brain’s capacity to support high-level linguistic functions such as syntactic processing? How does the brain recognize written symbols in order to extract meaning from them? How does language compare with direct sensory experience as a source of knowledge? To address these questions, I study syntax, Braille reading, and concepts in blind individuals using behavioral, fMRI, and TMS experiments.

  • Yun-Fei Liu

    Yun-Fei Liu

    yliu291@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: I’m interested in the neural basis of all kinds of reading, be it normal reading, Braille reading, or even code reading. You can say what I’m doing is some kind of rudimentary mind reading—with a super bulky MRI scanner!

  • Rita Loiotile

    Rita Loiotile

    rloioti1@jhu.edu

  • research assistant

  • Nora Harhen

    Nora Harhen

    nharhen1@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: I am interested in how experience shapes learning and decision-making. The efficient learning and flexible behavior we produce everyday is the product of multiple learning and decision-making systems. What are the individual contributions of each system? How do the weights of each system’s contribution vary with factors such as perceived costs and benefits, affect, and attention? What are the neural signatures of these interactions?

  • undergraduate research assistants

  • Brianna Ahmeier

    Brianna Ahmeier

    baheime1@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: I’m interested in the roles that nature and nurture play in shaping human cognition and behavior. I’m also curious about the underlying neural mechanisms involved in these developments.

  • Erin Brush

    Erin Brush

    ebrush1@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: Cognition, Neurological Development

  • Verónica Montané

    vmontan2@jhu.edu

    Research Interests: I am interested in the brain and how different experiences help shape the brain. I'm also interested in cognition and how knowledge is affected by experience.